SCULPTURE I  2019-20:

Course Description:

Students will discover connections to the world around them through art, present and past, and their own creative investigation of 3-dimensional materials and the study of sculpture.  The focus will be on the exploration of a variety of traditional sculpture media and techniques through the process of individual, personal expression. Students will solve visual problems and develop life-long skills through creative practices.

Course Outcomes:

By the end of the course students will gain confidence in their ability to create, utilizing sculpture as their vehicle.  Students will understand the Elements of Art and the Principles of Design and how to describe, analyze, interpret and judge art, both their own and others’ work.  Students will gain skill with tools and materials and practice creative problem solving.  Over the course of the year, assigned sculptures will survey a variety of sculpting methods, including construction from raw materials, manipulation of clay or other malleable materials, fusing and additive techniques, subtractive/carving methods, collection and collage, time-based art, and community and installation art.  Guest speakers, field trips, and interaction with school and local communities add dimension and career.

Course Requirements:

  •   Students are expected to be engaged in art making at all times.

  •   Students are willing to experiment with ideas, tools, methods, and materials in the creation of 3-dimensional   art.

  •   Students are expected to participate during class discussions, slide presentations, and critiques.

  •   Students are expected to “self-challenge”, putting full effort into projects, working at skill levels appropriate to each individual’s ability and experience.

Some homework may be necessary to complete assignments and students may need to provide additional materials as needed.

Sculpture Projects:

Projects may include:  Mask making, Hand-built Ceramics, Environmental Art, Altered Books, Sculpting with Natural and Found Objects, Wire and Tape Sculpture, Wood and Plaster Carving, Paper Mache - Life Size, Research and Art History, Group and Community Projects

Sketchbooks:

Sketchbooks are required and are an important part of the creative process.  Each student will be given a sketchbook to be used as a record of REGULAR creative thinking outside the classroom. Sketchbook work is due every other week on the first day of class.

Classroom Expectations & Consequences:

The sculpture studio is a safe and protected place to voice opinions, express beliefs and create meaning using the materials and methods presented.  This environment can only exist with mutual respect.  Respect for each other, respect for materials, and respect for the studio space itself.  Students are expected to follow all school policies regarding language, behavior, and attendance.  Clean up, classroom behavior, absences, and tardiness will seriously affect the participation components of your grade.

All consequences will be administered according to the teacher’s discretion, including detentions, loss of project points, and removal from the studio if actions warrant.

Evaluation & Grading:

Grades are based on participation and successful completion of each project and the specific requirements.  Final grades are based on creativity, craftsmanship, effort, and participation.  Assessment will be based on instructor observation and assessment, class critiques, and student self-evaluation

Incomplete work will not be accepted for credit.

  60%  Artwork completed to specified requirements - successful expression of intended meaning, structural integrity and technique, and surface treatment.

  10% Creative Thinking - the “aha!” factor, creativity and inventiveness of design, and self-challenge (risk factor!)

  20% Participation/Effort/Clean-up - to receive full participation points students must have 100% attention during demonstrations, engagement during class, and participation during class discussion.

  10% Sketchbook, Notes/Critiques, Research, and Final

Sculpture II  2019-20:

Course Description:

Students who have taken beginning sculpture will now be asked to discover deeper connections to the world around them.  This second year course offers exposure to new media, a broader historical and cultural study of sculpture, opportunities for portfolio development, and exhibitions.  Through art and their own creative investigation of 3-dimensional materials students will focus on the exploration of more advanced sculptural media and techniques through the process of individual, personal expression.  

Course Outcomes:

By the end of the course students will have advanced knowledge of sculpture and confidence in their ability to create, utilizing 3-dimensionality as their vehicle.  They will practice creative problem solving, understand the Elements of Art and the Principles of Design and how to describe, analyze, interpret and judge their own, their peers’ and professional art works, and gain a higher degree of skill with tools and materials.  

Course Requirements:  

Students are expected to be engaged in art making at all times.  Students are willing to experiment with ideas, tools, methods, and materials in the creation of 3-dimensional art.  Students are expected to participate during class discussions, slide presentations, and critiques.  Students are expected to “self-challenge”, putting full effort into projects, working at skill levels appropriate to each individual’s ability and experience.  Some homework may be necessary to complete assignments and students may need to provide additional materials as needed.

Sculpture Projects may include:  Art Historical Puppets, Hand-built Ceramics, Environmental Art & Installation, Mosaics & Stained Glass, Sculpting with Natural and Found Objects, Plaster/Wood Carving, Wire and Tape Sculpture, Mobiles, Paper Mache - Life Size, Research and Art History, Group and Community Projects, Self-Designed Projects, Assemblage, Final Digital Portfolio

Pre-Requisites:

Sculpture I or instructor approval by portfolio review on a case by case basis.

Sketchbooks:

Sketchbooks are required and are an important part of the creative process.  Each student will be given a sketchbook to be used as a record of REGULAR creative thinking outside the classroom. Sketchbook work is due every other week on the first day of class.

Classroom Expectations & Consequences:

The sculpture studio is a safe and protected place to voice opinions, express beliefs and create meaning using the materials and methods presented.  This environment can only exist with mutual respect for each other, for materials, and for the studio space itself.  Students are expected to follow all school policies regarding language, behavior, and attendance.  Clean up, classroom behavior, absences, and tardiness will seriously affect the participation components of your grade.  All consequences will be administered according to the teacher’s discretion, including detentions, loss of project points, and removal from the studio if actions warrant.

Evaluation & Grading:

Grades are based on participation and successful completion of each project and the specific requirements.  Final grades are based on creativity, craftsmanship, effort, and participation.  Assessment will be based on instructor observation and assessment, class critiques, and student self-evaluation.  Incomplete work will not be accepted for credit.

50%  Artwork completed to specified requirements - expression of intended meaning, structural integrity and technique, surface treatment.

20% Creative Thinking - creativity and inventiveness of design and self-challenge (risk factor)

20% Participation/Effort/Clean-up - full participation/attention during demonstrations, engagement in class, and daily clean up end of class

10% Sketchbook, Notes/Critiques, Research, and Final

Sculpture III  2019-20:

Course Description:

Advanced Sculpture builds on the skills and modalities taught in Sculpture I and II.  This third year course asks students to develop individual directions through advanced assignments, and challenges student critical thinking through overarching themes relevant to art realized in their everyday life.  Students will begin to prepare work suitable for submission through a student portfolio.  By the second semester's end, students will have the ability to objectively critique and articulate content and vision in their work and concretely place it in an historical context.  Students are required to maintain a detailed sketchbook that includes artistic vision, and to write and present an in-depth research paper on a selected exhibition of a sculptor.  Assigned work throughout the course will emphasize the technical as well as emotional, expressive and non-verbal communicative nature of three-dimensional media.  Students will also master advanced skills and expand their knowledge of the three-dimensional processes including but not limited to ceramics, wood, metals, fibers, plaster, stone and wire.  This course satisfies the Fine Arts requirement and may be repeated for credit upon recommendation of the instructor.  Students who successfully complete this course will be able to demonstrate mastery of advanced skills and expand their understanding of current and historical directions in three dimensional art through completed works, assigned written reviews of exhibits and class critiques.  Homework Expectation: 2 hours per week on average. 

Course Goals, Purpose, and Expected Student Outcome:

Advanced Sculpture will continue to emphasize the development of personal expression in student work with emphasis on and reference to the historical/contemporary tradition of sculpture.  During the process of completing assigned projects, each student will submit research materials, visuals, and concepts discovered that relate to the work produced.  Advanced Sculpture students will also be required to develop a presentation on a method, process, or body of work. Organization of presentation and research materials are a primary consideration for evaluation as well as the projects submitted.  Technology through the creation of personal web sites, electronic portfolios, and blogs will be required for advanced sculpture students, and their work will be photographed, updated regularly, and personal critiques applied for each concept and finished selection.

Course Objectives:

  • Students will embrace a range of forms, including figurative, formalist, conceptual, and installation.

  • Students will enhance their powers of three-dimensional expression through completion of individual pieces, moving towards the creation of a final portfolio.

  • Students will be provided the opportunity to learn sculptural skills, and experiment with them in a creative environment.

  • Students will increase their thought process, judgment, and awareness as well as their skills.

  • Students will have mentored independent study within the final 6 weeks to allow personal reflection of the constant evolution of the discipline and completion of an independent final piece.

  • Students will analyze, problem solve, communicate and defend choices on an advanced level, and will learn to document their work through submitted research materials, visuals, and concepts as a continuation of understanding process.  

  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of their work in connection with both contemporary society and contemporary art practice.

  • Students will learn to document their work through submitted research materials, visuals, and concepts as a continuation of understanding process.  

  • Students will cultivate a body of work that exemplifies maturity and sophistication in both technique and subject matter, and will be used in a personal portfolio.

  • Students will show technical proficiency with selected materials.

  • Students will evaluate, select and exhibit work thoughtfully and professionally.

  • Students will address technology through the creation of personal web sites and electronic portfolios/blogs.  Work will be photographed, updated regularly, and personal critiques applied for each concept and finished selection.

Course Outline: 

During this two-semester course, the value of art in each student’s life and the world around it will be contemplated and discovered.  Beginning with the asking of essential questions, students will be guided towards personal answers through the selection of assignments, materials, and the history of art that preceded them.

Some of the essential questions asked:

How is art meaningful/relevant in your life - why does art matter?

How does art serve the individual and society?

How does the history of art guide our vision?

1. Exploring Social Issues in Sculpture:

Developing students’ abilities to critically think about their own art making and its intent, and the importance of meaning and concept behind creating their work is a main focus. Students will explore artists who used their work as a platform for commenting on social issues throughout the world, such as Carrie Mae Weems and Doris Salcedo.  Students will brainstorm social issues, what they are, what they mean, and how they are perceived.  Students must select and think critically about a particular social issue, write a personal response involving research and reflection on an aspect of that issue, then solve the difficult problem of how to communicate the issue visually in their final piece.  Throughout the problem-solving students are asked to consider the elements of art and principles of design, and working within that framework, create their final piece with those in mind. The inclusion, understanding, and use of deconstruction/reconstruction will be discussed.  Aspects of discussion during the course of the project will include various communication venues from public display (graffiti) and installation to more subtle, personal works such as gallery selections.  Real world application through the creation of their own concept of social issues becomes the driving factor and force.

2. Beauty in Brokenness:

What does beauty look like?  What does broken look like?  Does beauty have to be a set standard agreed upon by others?  Is broken something less beautiful?  How would these two concepts be put together through art?  These are the essential questions that will guide student investigation in the creation of art that is personal, through the concept of “broken” beauty.  The final project will pursue the art of mosaic - hand created and found tiles, and found objects that reflect the concept being created - to achieve a piece based on beauty in brokenness.  Research, critique and discussion, both self and group, gallery/site visits will be utilized, as well as the work of mosaic artists such as Antoni Gaudi and Gerhard Marx, and contemporary sculptor El Anatsui’s Broken Bridge II. 

3. Public work/Installation:

Students are asked to recognize issues and perceptions about their community, then create either monumental or miniature installations in order to invite viewers to explore those perceptions through art.  The installations become a conversation about solitude, community, and the examination of the roles of citizens and fellow human beings in a shared urban reality.  Work is based not only on personal experience of the student but experiences from those who they come in contact with on a daily basis.  The work of Isaac Cordal, George Segal, and Mark Jenkins will be researched and discussed.  The completion of the final piece(s) will be dependent on the site selected and approval received from the administration, a written proposal outlining the concept, including images to scale within the location selected, and consideration of the community in which the installation will be placed.  Students may work with either full sized tape constructed figures or miniature clay or soap stone figures, depending on the concept.  Final submission of the piece will include documentation of community reaction and discussion of the perceptions realized.

4. Nature – Turning of the Form:

In nature, the concept of “turning of the form” is evident in everything from trees and how they develop to shells and the spiraling direction created both by the creatures they protect and the flow of water around them.  Students will explore the turning and twisting of forms in and out of space and become more sensitive to creating dimensional pieces that display movement as well as form and shape.  Students will be able to see and discover the twisting movement of the form and recreate it through touch and sight, as well as recognizing the turning movement in the nature of objects. Students will work with a single object of their choice – a shell or organic root such as a ginger root, working so that it has monumental scale.  When completed, students will learn to see through form, to visualize the whole movement and to sense its rhythm.  Looking at the work of artists Deborah Butterfield, Jane Rosen, Henry Moore and the natural artistry of shells, found driftwood, roots and beach stones, students will discover and see how each material repeats and opposes forming a simple overall rhythm that they will have recreated through sight and touch.  Materials used will be clay, paper clay, and a selection of shells, driftwood, organic roots and beach stone.

5. Exploration of Self:

Whether exploring their own psyche or simply because they are inexpensive and available, artists in every medium have attempted some form of self-portraiture or  “exploration of self”.  With this in mind, students will research the concept of what a self portrait is, both traditional and non-traditional, from busts to abstract concepts of artists displaying who they are and how they wish to be perceived.  In an attempt to understand the purpose of these works and how both the artists and viewer benefit, students will create an “exploration of self” through the creation of an article of clothing made from wire and additional materials as seem appropriate.  Students will respond to the work of artists such as Leigh Pennebaker, Lesley Dill, and Susan Cutts, and use these images as a beginning to their own exploration of who they are and whom they wish others to see them as.  Preliminary studies including the creation of maquette prior to the completed piece will be part of the creative process.

6. Personal Meaning within Personal Space: Where is your refuge? 

Personal identity and the emotional state “Refuge” implies becomes the focus of students who must consider what refuge means not only to themselves but also to others – both human and not.  It can be described as “a stronghold which protects by its strength, or a sanctuary which secures safety by its sacredness; a place inaccessible to an enemy”.  Once realized, students will create their personal refuge in the form of a nest.  The concept of creating a personal refuge takes on an emotional impact for students who will discover not only what it will look like but also where it will be placed, what it will hold, and the materials necessary for the finished project.  The work of Jayson Fann, German artist Nils-Udo, and Beckey Kaye will be discussed, along with the natural art of birds and net-building techniques and placement.

7. Environmental and Earth Art – Collaborative Design using nature:

This assignment might appear to fall under the category of Public Work/Installation, but deserves a separate heading in that the concept of “proposal” work becomes an even more important piece of this collaborative project.  Beginning with the study of artists such as Andy Goldsworthy and Robert Smithson, Agnes Denes, the Red Earth Environmental Art Group, and cultural awareness of environmental art such as that created by the Nazca people of Peru.  Students will use the Elements of Art and the Principles of Design, along with the properties and philosophies of the campus the school exists on and with, to create an environmental design through the use of natural resources available.  Small group collaboration allows this assignment to be worked on within a time frame that goes beyond the classroom and communication skills become essential for these works of art to be designed, approved, and completed.  The landscape of the school and the students’ relationship to it are the focus, and the process of each student creation becomes the art.  Work will be documented through initial proposals and presentations, illustrations/mock-ups of the concept, documentation of the progress and final presentation and critique.

8.  Community Application:

The significance of real-world application in the creation of 3 dimensional art is often overlooked in course work.  With this assignment, students are challenged with creating vessels built on the theme of curing hunger in the community.  Working with local restaurants in what is called The Empty Bowl Project, students will donate their created vessels to the community in a school-wide display and exhibition, auctioning off the bowls and using the funds to fight hunger.  The purpose of this assignment is to bring the community into the classroom and allow students to witness an event utilizing their art as part of a larger picture.  What began in Michigan with an art teacher helping students solve a problem for raising funds to support a food drive, evolved into a class project making ceramic bowls, serving soup and bread for a donated amount, and allowing guests to keep the bowls as a reminder of hunger in the world.  Real-world application of student art and participation.

9. Final Portfolio Review, Critique and Exhibition:

While students continually create and add to a portfolio of work, at years end a formal group critique, by way of a student exhibition of work, will be the final outcome.  Final portfolios will be submitted as photographs (minimum of two views for each piece) and in a creative application – book, album, time line.  All final work will be displayed in the school gallery and a student-run art opening will be arranged.

 

 

Sculpture III (Honors component)  2019-20:

The Honors Component:

The Honors course will develop students’ own ideas, allowing discussion of complex theories and issues, and encouraging innovation in an atmosphere where students’ views are respected. The Honors program will emphasize diverse perspectives and a greater interaction between student and teacher. The course is about learning to think clearly, to write well, and to argue thoughtfully. It works towards developing each student’s fullest potential.  It is also designed to provide more academic rigor and to challenge students, preparing them for college courses and real-world applications.  The course is designed to be an enriched program rather than a passive learning approach with extra reading and research.  Student thinking will be stimulated; they will have use of innovative and new materials for the creation of more complex concepts and personal explorations.  The course encourages further discussion and debate on art and artists in society, both past and present, along with attitudes and practices world-wide. Honors students will have the additional requirement of attending museum and gallery openings, meeting with curators and the artists and their work, and will experience art in public displays, bringing guest expertise into the classroom.  Students in the Honors program will be asked to think more deeply in their research about and application to assignments, and readings from selected texts will be required.  The work done will be taken from the same topic and structure format as the Advanced Sculpture program, but students will take a further step to understanding by being asked to make associations with each of the projects, linking them to three dimensional art both past and present, and the significance of the work in those societies which supported (or not) the work.  Honors students will be further asked to choose one of the eight topics in Advanced Sculpture, delve into it more deeply, and creating a final presentation based on criteria given at the beginning of the year.  Criteria will include discovering and reporting on the significance of the art, artist, and movement and tying those concepts to public reaction, the affect the work placed on emerging styles and concepts, and ultimately, the reaction received and subsequent acceptance (or not).  A final presentation and debate on a selected topic of discussion will allow all students in the program to participate and encourage diverse viewpoints and reactions.

AP STUDIO 2-D & DRAWING PORTFOLIOS 2019-20:

Course Description:

AP Studio 2D and Drawing portfolios are the culmination of personal work created over a period of time.  A portion of the work created may come from previous classes.  Work in a final portfolio must fit into three categories:  Quality, Breadth, and Concentration (Sustained Investigation).  Final portfolios will be submitted May 10, 2019.  Portfolios consist of a minimum of 24 pieces; 5 physical works for the quality section, 12 digital images: 1 image each of 12 different works for the breadth section, and 12 digital images: some may be details or process images for the concentration section.

AP Studio 2D works must demonstrate an understanding of two-dimensional design in concept, composition, and execution (quality), an in-depth exploration of a particular 2-D design concern (sustained investigation), and an understanding of 2-D design (breadth).

AP Drawing works must demonstrate an understanding of drawing in concept, composition, and execution (quality), an in-depth exploration of a particular drawing concern (sustained investigation), and a variety of works demonstrating an understanding of drawing (breadth).

Course Completion: 

Students are required to submit a completed portfolio, a final work (to be determined) created after the portfolio submission, and a "One Woman" show created within a miniature gallery setting, displaying all works in the final portfolio submitted.

Requirements & Pre-requisites:

Students are required to have completed Art 1, 2, and 3, OR instructor approval of a student submitted portfolio of work.  

Personal Blog/Sketchbook:

Students are required to create a personal Blog and maintain a "masterwork" sketchbook.  Blog links will be on the AP Studio Site

and are to be updated regularly with current work, concepts, and self reflection.

Critiques:

A major portion of the class will be monthly individual and group critiques.

Classroom Expectations:

Students are expected to be present and working, every class.  

Evaluation & Grading:

65% of grade  - personal work and individual critiques

15% of grade  - "Masterwork" sketchbook

20% of grade  - participation and group critiques